Saudi Arabia

Saudis Bomb Russian Consulate in Yemen

From Global Research

During US-led NATO’s rape of Yugoslavia, China’s Belgrade embassy was willfully bombed.

Claiming by mistake didn’t wash. The Pentagon included China’s embassy on its target list.

Yemen is Obama’s war. Saudis and other regional states involved are US proxies.

Months of planning preceded air and naval strikes. Yemeni targets were carefully chosen – among them Russia’s Aden consulate. Maybe its Sanaa embassy is next.

Bombing its Aden consulate is part of Washington’s increasing confrontation with Moscow – a reckless agenda including vicious propaganda, US Ukraine policy, its growing Eastern European military footprint and saber rattling exercises close to Russia’s borders.

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Is Yemen Ripe for Revolution?

A question I have been contemplating much of the day is, “Is Yemen ripe for a revolution?” The crisis in Yemen has been in the news as the Saudi-led coalition has launched airstrikes in the country and imposed a naval blockade in support of the deposed Yemeni President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi.

The objective conditions of the crisis in Yemen and of Western imperialism’s frantic reaction remind me somewhat of the conditions of Czarist Russia before the 1917 revolution, an underdeveloped appendage of imperialism, and of a passage in Lenin’s pamphlet Left-Wing Communism:

“The fundamental law of revolution, which has been confirmed by all revolutions and especially by all three Russian revolutions in the twentieth century, is as follows: for a revolution to take place it is not enough for the exploited and oppressed masses to realize the impossibility of living in the old way, and demand changes; for a revolution to take place it is essential that the exploiters should not be able to live and rule in the old way. It is only when the “lower classes” do not want to live in the old way and the “upper classes” cannot carry on in the old way that the revolution can triumph. This truth can be expressed in other words: revolution is impossible without a nation-wide crisis (affecting both the exploited and the exploiters). It follows that, for a revolution to take place, it is essential, first, that a majority of the workers (or at least a majority of the class-conscious, thinking, and politically active workers) should fully realize that revolution is necessary, and that they should be prepared to die for it; second, that the ruling classes should be going through a governmental crisis, which draws even the most backward masses into politics (symptomatic of any genuine revolution is a rapid, tenfold and even hundredfold increase in the size of the working and oppressed masses—hitherto apathetic—who are capable of waging the political struggle), weakens the government, and makes it possible for the revolutionaries to rapidly overthrow it.”

Yemen earlier went through a revolution in 2011, when tens of thousands of working people demonstrated against unemployment, corruption, and a proposed constitutional amendment that would allow the despised former President Ali Abdullah Saleh to remain in power for life. Saleh was widely seen as an instrument of Western imperialism, having been a faithful ally in the U.S.-led ‘War on Terror’, and in Yemen more than a thousand people have been killed, including American citizens, by U.S. drone strikes, causing public outrage. The state security services responded to the demonstrations with force, shooting dead dozens of protestors, sparking an armed conflict that overthrew the Saleh regime. The regime was replaced by Saleh’s Vice-President Abd-Rabbuh Manṣour Al-Hadi in a transition approved by the reactionary, undemocratic Gulf Cooperation Council.

The new regime continued many of the same policies as the previous, abolishing fuel subsidies to the already desperately impoverished population, reneging on previous promises of sharing political power, and remaining a faithful ally of Western imperialism, causing a new wave of unrest in the country. Hadi was forced to resign and feel the capital as rebels occupied the city and established a new government under the rebel commander Mohammed Ali al-Houthi.

The fall of Hadi was a major setback for Western imperialism; 3.8 million barrels of oil a day pass through the strait of Bab el-Mandeb, making it the fourth largest waterway in the world. Western imperialism threw itself at Yemen, with Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Egypt, Israel, Turkey, France, the U.K., etc.. either launching airstrikes in the country, killing dozens of people, or providing logistical support for the deposed Hadi regime.

Will Yemen prove to be the weakest link in the chain of imperialism…?

The Geopolitics Behind the War in Yemen

From Information Clearing House

The United States and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia became very uneasy when the Yemenese or Yemenite movement of the Houthi or Ansarallah (meaning the supporters of God in Arabic) gained control of Yemen’s capital, Sanaa/Sana, in September 2014. The US-supported Yemenite President Abd-Rabbuh Manṣour Al-Hadi was humiliatingly forced to share power with the Houthis and the coalition of northern Yemenese tribes that had helped them enter Sana. Al-Hadi declared that negotiations for a Yemeni national unity government would take place and his allies the US and Saudi Arabia tried to use a new national dialogue and mediated talks to co-opt and pacify the Houthis.

The truth has been turned on its head about the war in Yemen. The war and ousting of President Abd-Rabbuh Manṣour Al-Hadi in Yemen are not the results of “Houthi coup” in Yemen. It is the opposite. Al-Hadi was ousted, because with Saudi and US support he tried to backtrack on the power sharing agreements he had made and return Yemen to authoritarian rule. The ousting of President Al-Hadi by the Houthis and their political allies was an unexpected reaction to the takeover Al-Hadi was planning with Washington and the House of Saudi.

The Houthis and their allies represent a diverse cross-section of Yemeni society and the majority of Yemenites. The Houthi movement’s domestic alliance against Al-Hadi includes Shiite Muslims and Sunni Muslims alike. The US and House of Saud never thought that they Houthis would assert themselves by removing Al-Hadi from power, but this reaction had been a decade in the making. With the House of Saud, Al-Hadi had been involved in the persecution of the Houthis and the manipulation of tribal politics in Yemen even before he became president. When he became Yemeni president he dragged his feet and was working against the implement the arrangements that had been arranged through consensus and negotiations in Yemen’s National Dialogue, which convened after Ali Abdullah Saleh was forced to hand over his powers in 2011.

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US Threatens Military Intervention as UN Warns of “Disintegration” in Yemen

From WSWS

Yemen faces “civil war and disintegration” in the wake of the overthrow of the US-backed government by a Houthi insurgency, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki Moon declared Thursday.

“Yemen is collapsing before our eyes. We cannot stand by and watch. The current instability is creating conditions which are conducive to a reemergence of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP),” Moon said.

The comments from Moon come in the aftermath of moves by the Houthis to take over the presidential palace last week, formally dissolving the US-backed regime of Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. The Houthis have simultaneously launched new invasions of provinces to the south of Sanaa, in an effort to bring larger sections of the country under the direct control of their new regime.

This has been accompanied by reports of the seizure of a major government military installation, manned by some 2,000 troops, by Sunni militants affiliated with AQAP.

Comments from US officials late this week suggested that the US ruling elite is preparing to respond to the breakup of the Yemeni state with a new military escalation, ostensibly directed at combatting AQAP, but aimed more broadly at asserting control over the geostrategically key country.

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